Noticeboard

Face Coverings
 
From Monday 15th June 2020, if you are asked to attend the surgery for a face to face appointment you will be required to wear a face covering. 
Unfortunately if you attend your appointment without a face covering we will not be able to provide you with one and you will be turned away.
Please click here for Government advice regarding suitable face coverings.

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IMPORTANT ADVICE ABOUT CORONAVIRUS

The UK has now moved to the containment phase to the delay phase on managing COVID 19 pandemic. If you think you have been exposed to Coronavirus please contact NHS111. DO NOT ATTEND New Road Surgery unless instructed to do so by a doctor or nurse at the Surgery. Thank you.

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Text messages:

There may be occasions where it would be mutually convenient for us to contact you by text message. Please contact us to let us know if you would prefer this method of communication, and ensure we have your correct mobile number.

Urgent Prescription Requests

 

We will be changing the way we process on the day/urgent prescription requests from 31st August 2020.

 

We are often asked to raise these urgently, often at very short notice, due to patients failing to order in advance. This impacts greatly on our workload because each repeat prescription request has to be checked personally by us to ensure it is safe to issue. If you ask us to do a repeat prescription on the same day it means that it has to be handled separately from the normal requests, and this means we have to take time out of our schedule to check it. Doing it this way increases the chances of a mistake being made and also can also lead to appointments times running late. Asking us to do a prescription on the same day is, in effect, jumping the queue. You may think ‘but it’s just one prescription’, but we have over 13,000 patients and can have many requests per day.

 

At the time of writing, we are seeing an increasing number of “same day requests.” We feel this is not safe and so have changed our rules regarding medication requests.

 

From the 31st August, all requests for repeat prescriptions will be subject to our “2 working days” turnaround, to ensure safety and fairness. It is your responsibility to ensure you order your repeat prescription in plenty of time.

 

Many medications can safely be missed for a few days if you do run out.

There are, of course, a few medications that must not be missed (such as Insulin and anti-epileptic drugs), and if you run out of one of these, then please explain this to our staff when you ring. We will issue such prescriptions as a one-off on the day in the first instance, but you will be asked to ensure you do not run out again and will be directed to this message on our website.

 

Please respect our staff if they explain this new process to you – they are working under instruction from the doctors and we are all doing our best to ensure safety of all our patients.

 

Thank you for your understanding.

 

The Doctors

Travelling to Europe in 2020?

There have been a significant outbreak of MEASLES number of European Countries. All travellers who have not previously had 2 doses of a measles containing vaccine (e.g. the MMR) should consider being vaccinated before travel. For further information see Measles: (http://www.travax.nhs.uk/diseases/vaccine-preventable/measles-mumps-rubella.aspx). If in doubt submit a Travel Form and arrange a telephone consultation in our Travel Clinic.


Don't forget to leave enough time to order your repeat prescriptions before your holidays and MOST IMPORTANTLY, take your medications on holiday with you!

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 YOUR APPOINTMENT -

KEEP IT, CANCEL IT, BUT PLEASE DON'T WASTE IT!!!

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Out of Hours

If you need a doctor out of normal working hours, ring 111.


Cancelling your Appointment

To find out how to cancel your appointment

Click Here


Having problems logging in to Patient Access?

Forgotten your password?

If so, please contact the surgery for assistance.

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Lost Property

If you believe you have left something behind, please ask at reception.

 

 

 

Family Health

Planning Your Pregnancy

Child Health 0 - 6 Years

Child Health 7 to 15 Years

Routine childhood immunisations 

Girls aged 12 to 13 years old Cervical cancer caused by human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 (and genital warts caused by types 6 and 11) HPV (two doses 6-12 months) Upper arm
14 years old (school year 9) Tetanus, diphtheria and polio Td/IPV (Revaxis), and check MMR status Upper arm
Meningococcal groups A, C, W
and Y disease
MenACWY Upper arm

Please note

** Where two or more injections are required at once, these should ideally be given in different limbs. Where this is not possible, injections in the same limb should be given 2.5cm apart.

The Meningitis C vaccination will be introduced during the 2013/14 academic year and the vaccine supplied will depend on the brands available at the time of ordering


When Should I Worry?

Having an ill child can be a very scary experience for parents. If you understand more about the illness it can help you to feel more in control. This booklet is for parents (and older children) and deals with common infections in children who are normally healthy.

Download the booklet

There is a good guide on the NHS website which describes various conditions affecting children. There is advice on how to diagnose them, how to treat them and if further advice should be consulted.

NHS childhood illness slideshow


Fevers

Most symptoms of a fever in young children can be managed at home with infant paracetamol. If the fever is very high, they may have an infection that needs treating with antibiotics.


Head Lice

Head lice are insects that live on the scalp and neck. They may make your head feel itchy. Although head lice may be embarrassing and sometimes uncomfortable, they don't usually cause illness. However, they won't clear up on their own and you need to treat them promptly


Nosebleeds

Nosebleeds (also known as epistaxis) are fairly common, especially in children, and can generally be easily treated.


NHS Conditions and Treatments

See the NHS Conditions and Treatments browser for an in-depth description of many common health issues.

These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Men

Women

Seniors

Sexual Health

 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website