Noticeboard

Face Coverings
 
From Monday 15th June 2020, if you are asked to attend the surgery for a face to face appointment you will be required to wear a face covering. 
Unfortunately if you attend your appointment without a face covering we will not be able to provide you with one and you will be turned away.
Please click here for Government advice regarding suitable face coverings.

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IMPORTANT ADVICE ABOUT CORONAVIRUS

The UK has now moved to the containment phase to the delay phase on managing COVID 19 pandemic. If you think you have been exposed to Coronavirus please contact NHS111. DO NOT ATTEND New Road Surgery unless instructed to do so by a doctor or nurse at the Surgery. Thank you.

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Text messages:

There may be occasions where it would be mutually convenient for us to contact you by text message. Please contact us to let us know if you would prefer this method of communication, and ensure we have your correct mobile number.

Travelling to Europe in 2020?

There have been a significant outbreak of MEASLES number of European Countries. All travellers who have not previously had 2 doses of a measles containing vaccine (e.g. the MMR) should consider being vaccinated before travel. For further information see Measles: (http://www.travax.nhs.uk/diseases/vaccine-preventable/measles-mumps-rubella.aspx). If in doubt submit a Travel Form and arrange a telephone consultation in our Travel Clinic.


Don't forget to leave enough time to order your repeat prescriptions before your holidays and MOST IMPORTANTLY, take your medications on holiday with you!

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 YOUR APPOINTMENT -

KEEP IT, CANCEL IT, BUT PLEASE DON'T WASTE IT!!!

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Out of Hours

If you need a doctor out of normal working hours, ring 111.


Cancelling your Appointment

To find out how to cancel your appointment

Click Here


Having problems logging in to Patient Access?

Forgotten your password?

If so, please contact the surgery for assistance.

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Lost Property

If you believe you have left something behind, please ask at reception.

 

 

 

<h3> <img style="WIDTH: 135px; FLOAT: right; HEIGHT: 58px" src="/images/nhs_choices.gif" width="135" height="52" />NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments</h3> <p>See the <a href="http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Pages/hub.aspx" target="_blank">NHS Choices Conditions and Treatments browser</a> for an in-depth description of many common health issues.</p> <p> </p> <hr /> <h2 class="scalesHeading">Decision aids</h2> <p class="summary"> <a href="http://www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk/DecisionAids" target="_blank">NHS Direct Patient Decision Aids (PDAs)</a> are designed to help patients make difficult decisions about their treatments and medical tests. They are used when there is no clinical evidence to suggest that one treatment is better than another and patients need help in deciding which option will be best for them. </p> <h3>Cervical Screening (Smear Tests)</h3> <span style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 5px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 5px; FLOAT: right; PADDING-TOP: 5px"> <object width="250" height="200"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/mFUGLEfwFx0&hl=en_GB&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x5d1719&color2=0xcd311b" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> <param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /> <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/mFUGLEfwFx0&hl=en_GB&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x5d1719&color2=0xcd311b" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="250" height="200"> </embed> </object> </span> <p>Cervical screening is a method of preventing cervical cancer by detecting abnormal cells in the cervix (lower part of the womb). Cervical screening is not a test for cancer, but it is a test to check the health of the cervix. </p> <p>Most women&#39;s test results show that everything is normal. But for one in 20 women, the test will show some changes in the cells of the cervix. Most of these changes will not lead to cervical cancer and the cells will go back to normal on their own. In some cases, the abnormal cells need to be treated to prevent them becoming a problem later.  </p> <p> <a href="http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cervical-screening-test/Pages/Introduction.aspx" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" linkindex="57">NHS Choices - Cervical Screening</a> <br />The why, when & how guide to cervical screening</p> <p> <a href="http://hcd2.bupa.co.uk/fact_sheets/html/cervical_screening.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" linkindex="58">Cervical Screening</a> <br />This factsheet is for women who would like information about having a cervical smear test for screening. This means having the test when you don&#39;t have any symptoms.</p> <h3> <hr />HPV Vaccination</h3> <p>Since September 2008 there has been a national programme to vaccinate girls aged 12-13 against human papilloma virus (HPV).  There is also a three-year catch up campaign that will offer the HPV vaccine (also known as the cervical cancer jab) to 13-18 year old girls.</p> <p>The programme is delivered largely through secondary schools, and consists of three injections that are given over a six-month period. In the UK, more than 1.4 million doses have been given since the vaccination programme started.</p> <p> <strong>What is Human papilloma virus (HPV)?</strong> <br />Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the name of a family of viruses that affect the skin and the moist membranes that line your body, such as those in your cervix, anus, mouth and throat. These membranes are called the mucosa.</p> <p>There are more than 100 different types of HPV viruses, with about 40 types affecting the genital area. These are classed as high risk and low risk.</p> <span style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 5px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 5px; FLOAT: right; PADDING-TOP: 5px"> <embed height="200" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="325" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/SVGvC9ZyIu8&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;hl=en&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;fs=1&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;rel=0&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;color1=0x402061&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;color2=0x9461ca" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"> </embed> </span> <p> <strong>How you get HPV?</strong> <br />Types of HPV that affect the skin can be passed on by skin contact with an affected person. The types of HPV that affect the mouth and throat can be passed on through kissing. Genital HPV is usually spread through intimate, skin to skin, contact during sex. You can have the genital HPV virus for years and not have any sign of it.  </p> <p> <strong>How HPV can cause cervical cancer?<br /></strong>Most HPV infections are harmless or cause genital warts, however some types can cause cervical cancer. Most HPV infections clear up by themselves, but in some people the infection can last a long time. HPV infects the cells of the surface of the cervix where it can stay for many years without you knowing. </p> <p>The HPV virus can damage these cells leading to changes in their appearance. Over time, these changes can develop into cervical cancer. The purpose of cervical screening (testing) is to detect these changes, which, if picked up early enough, can be treated to prevent cancer happening. If they are left untreated, cancer can develop and may lead to serious illness and death.  </p> <h3> <hr />Resources</h3> <p> <a href="http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/help/default.asp?page=5193" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" linkindex="59"> <font color="#964646">Cancer Research UK</font> </a> <br />HPV Facts and information</p> <p> <a href="http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/hpv-vaccination/Pages/Introduction.aspx" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" linkindex="60"> <font color="#964646">NHS Choices - HPV Vaccination<br /></font> </a>Why, how and when is the vaccination given and what are the side effects</p> <p> <a href="http://hcd2.bupa.co.uk/fact_sheets/html/hpv_vaccine.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" linkindex="61"> <font color="#964646">HPV Vaccine</font> </a> <br />This factsheet is for people who would like information about the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine.</p> <hr /> <em>These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice</em>
 
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